A Couple of Transatlantic Misunderstandings – Part 3

I want to pick up on something I said in the last post and give it the emphasis it deserves, and it’s my simple observation that none of us know what we are wrong about. Think about it! If we knew we were wrong about something then we would presumably make correction and not be wrong any more. A simple principle, for sure, but greatly overlooked and misunderstood! And greatly overlooked and misunderstood by Christians too!

Because flights don’t always get me where my car is there are times when I have to rent one, and because rentals are nearly-new they tend to have all the bells and whistles which I only know exist because of renting them. Indeed, after a ten hour drive in a real beauty last year I’d just about figured out by the time we arrived at the airport to fly home that I could have probably driven the whole distance just talking to it via the onboard computer. Man, there wasn’t much that thing couldn’t do pretty much completely automatically. On the last really cool car I rented I noticed that the side-view mirrors had a little symbol in the corner that would regularly light up, but I couldn’t for the life of me work out why they would or why they were there. Belinda eventually figured out though that the flashing symbols were there to alert me when any vehicle alongside but to the rear was in my blindspot. And there you have it! Just as with driving, we all have blindspots in our lives! And the thing about blindspots is that you don’t, by very definition, know what’s in them! And that means that we don’t know what we are wrong about, and that we therefore need to be open to correction from others, such correction being the equivalent of those little symbols lighting up on the side view mirror of my rental car.

One of the greatest biblical virtues is that of humility, and one of the ways in which genuine humility is revealed is through an open mind to the fact that we could be wrong about absolutely anything. As we saw last time, this doesn’t prevent us from being definite regarding to our best and honest biblical understanding of various matters, but it does preserve us from the kind of closed-minded dogmatism that is more to do with needing to be seen to be right about something (self-righteousness, in fact), rather than simply establishing from scripture whether we actually are right or not.

And it seems to me that there are two main ways in which we avoid facing up to things about which we are wrong, but about which we are determined to keep believing that we are right. The first is to simply avoid anything that might address, or present challenge to, whatever the thing in question might be. The tactic, so to speak, of denial plus avoidance! We just don’t talk about whatever it might be, or address it in any way. We keep it ‘off the table’ and avoid talking about it with anyone who might present a threat or challenge to us regarding it. This is why, for example, so many aspects of what the Bible teaches are quite intentionally never referred to, being studiously ignored, by Christian leaders and teachers and those who follow them.

The second way to avoid having to face up to the fact that we might be wrong about something is to become so entrenched in our convictions, biblical or otherwise, that instead of genuine discussion with others we are simply concerned to ‘win the argument’ and not even properly listen to any contrary thinking or ideas. Our concern should rather be, “What saith the scriptures?” with an accompanying attitude of genuinely testing ourselves to see if we are truly seeking to then conform our thinking and lives to what they say.

So this isn’t just about belief and doctrine. It’s about how  we actually live day to day as husbands and wives, as parents and children, as employers or employees and as neighbours to those who live in our street. It’s about how honest we are being regarding our sin and failure, and about then repenting of that sin and failure and putting things right both with the Lord and any others whom our sin has affected. As sinners our default state, our knee-jerk reaction, our instinctive and instant response to any revealed consequences of our own wrongdoing, is to try to deny the reality of the situation and to excuse and justify ourselves regarding it, so as to not only deny our sin but to shift the blame onto others. Humbling ourselves under the mighty hand of God, as scripture commands us to do, is therefore the way in which we initiate, and continue, the ongoing process of reversing this.

In the Garden of Eden, as soon as sin entered the human domain, Eve blamed the serpent, and Adam blamed Eve and then the Lord. Humility, however, embraces the simple understanding that my sin is my fault and not yours, and that I am the only one who can repent of it and make restitution in the Lord for it. Humility also embraces the simple fact that 1) We are wrong about an awful lot of things which we aren’t even aware of yet, and 2) Without the help and correction of others we will never see much of what that wrongness actually is.

As I maintained in the previous couple of posts, we are indeed free to always think we are right, but not to ever think that we are always right! And now we must add this: When sin has disrupted my relationship with others in any way it might be entirely their fault and not mine. It might also be a case that both they and I have contributed wrongdoing to the situation. Or it might be that the situation is entirely my own wrongdoing! But irrespective of which of these three possibilities it is, the one thing I must never do is to automatically give myself the benefit of the doubt and to simply assume that the odds are that I am right, and that the wrongdoing is entirely someone else’s.

The Lord’s humility reveals itself by His willingness to be in a lowlier position than the one of which He is worthy. For ourselves, however, humility must acknowledge that we are not actually worthy of anything at all, and that also, unlike the Lord, we have ongoing wrong-thinking and wrongdoing that we need to both admit to and put right.

This is a big part of why even so many Christians who are aware of what scripture teaches regarding church life, and who have actual opportunity to avail themselves of it, nevertheless decide to either remain in unbiblical churches or just become churchless. Both options, however, avoid  meaningful personal accountability! The first because unbiblical churches are impersonal, and the latter because it excludes even the most basic commitment to anyone or anything, and even avoids scriptures command that we regularly gather together with other believers for mutual edification and spiritual growth. The former is to hide in a crowd, whilst the latter is to just avoid others completely! In strong contrast to both scripture teaches that we should embrace true life-sharing fellowship with others in which we become truly open and known.

Look, no-one enjoys being corrected! Or at least, I don’t! I really, really do understand that! Given the choice between watching some Star Trek or having someone correct me for something, guess which one I’d go for! Indeed, I’d rather watch chick-flics, which I truly can’t stand! But hey, even watching chick-flics beats being corrected by someone, eh? But like so many things in life correction isn’t meant to be enjoyable, it’s meant to be part of our walk with the Lord so as to sanctify us and conform us ever more into His likeness and character!

 

 

A Little Bit More on Aliens!

Many moons ago now, when I was a young man and dinosaurs ruled the world, I (of course) went to the cinema to see the (then) groundbreaking first Alien movie. It was, to my mind, both a masterpiece and complete revelation. However, what spoiled it somewhat was the fact that it was slightly out of focus, a fact I complained about at some volume at one point during the showing. (Yes, I know! But I was young!) How ridiculous, I mused, that a projectionist can’t focus his projector properly. But hey, no-one’s perfect all the time!

A few years later, whilst I was still young man but recently and gloriously married to Belinda, I quickly discovered that I had a little helper in the car. She helped me with all kinds of things…how fast I was going….when traffic lights were changing….when someone was crossing the road in front of me etc etc. And one of the things I couldn’t help but notice was that she would see what road signs said a few seconds before I did. This, I concluded, could only be down to one thing, so off I went to an opticians……only to find…..yes, you’ve guessed……that I needed glasses for distance viewing.

In the days that followed after getting my first pair I couldn’t believe how sharp, colourful and crystal clear everything was, and just how much fine detail I had been missing all that time. And then I remembered…..going to see Alien…..and complaining that the film wasn’t properly in focus. We have a word here in England that describes anyone functioning on significantly less than a full brain-load of grey matter….pillock! And yes, I felt a right pillock! It wasn’t that the film was out of focus and that the projectionist wasn’t doing his job properly, it was that my eyes were deficient and that I wasn’t seeing the screen properly.

You probably know where this is going now, and indeed it is! I have learned to be very careful to not jump to conclusions when I perceive something to be wrong, and not to make quick judgements until I am happy I have all the angles covered. I still get things wrong at times, of course, but the principle stands! But the main point I want to make here though is this:

I have spent a lifetime teaching things from God’s Word which no-one has ever actually been able to refute from that Word! I have been disagreed with and disavowed by lots of people on many occasions, but the things I teach that so upset folk have never been countered and shown to be error actually from scripture itself. Somebody once well said that it wasn’t the bits of the Bible they didn’t understand that troubled them, but precisely the bits they did. There are bits in the Bible that are obviously there, but which just don’t suit a great many Christians.

The next time you knee-jerk react against something you hear someone maintain to be biblical because it offends you, make sure you first establish whether it is actually biblical or not. Then still don’t react, but rather respond! There is every chance that it is not that something unbiblical is being said, but merely that you just don’t happen to like it and want to justify and excuse yourself! Or to put it another way, it’s not that the projector isn’t in focus, but rather that we need glasses!

 

I actually promised someone that I would never do a film review on this blog; but hey, this is different…

I’m pretty sure that Belinda, Bethany and I were just about the only Christians to have stepped on US soil in the last few months who hadn’t seen the War Room. Well, we watched it last night and reckon we’ll stop crying some time next week. Man, what a ride! And yes, I know it was all a bit cotton candy, and that things don’t always work out as wonderfully as they did for the family depicted in the film, even though spouses have been equally seeking the Lord and praying. Sometimes there is reconciliation and sometimes there is pain. No guarantees on that level. But hey, it was inspirational and edifying beyond words, so praise the Lord for it!

Favourite lines:

Clara alone in her kitchen: “Satan, you sure got your butt kicked!”

Elizabeth to her repentant husband Tony: “I’d rather have a man whose chasing after Jesus than a nice house!”

I tell you, we all need a Clara in our lives. No! I’ll rephrase that! We all need to become like Clara!

If you haven’t seen War Room then make sure you do!!!!